Everything Collections Notes

Simon Ruiz / @ruiz

Web developer specializing in B2B SaaS
"First of all, I think that being great is doing something no one can do. But also what separates those people, the ones you mentioned like LeBron or like what I'm thinking with M.J. or Gretzky, it's just the duration," Woods said. "Being able to do it not just for one year or one game or a little spell, they're able to do it for a number of years and accumulate highlights that we will always look at. They're peppered in our memories."
ruiz
"The universe is full of magical things patiently waiting for our wits to grow sharper." -Eden Phillpotts
ruiz
Playboy: How long did it take to develop Macintosh? Jobs: It was more than two years on the computer itself. We had been working on the technology behind it for years before that. I don’t think I’ve ever worked so hard on something, but working on Macintosh was the neatest experience of my life. Almost everyone who worked on it will say that. None of us wanted to release it at the end. It was as though we knew that once it was out of our hands, it wouldn’t be ours anymore. When we finally presented it at the shareholders’ meeting, everyone in the auditorium stood up and gave it a five-minute ovation. What was incredible to me was that I could see the Mac team in the first few rows. It was as though none of us could believe that we’d actually finished it. Everyone started crying.
ruiz
"We're prepared for a relatively slow start, especially from our Macintosh experience, where it took until 1986 for the Macintosh to find its legs," says Andy. "Same thing here. The screens aren't really good enough to satisfy the customer we have in mind these days. It's too low-contrast. You have to kind of take this leap of faith. They don't run long enough on batteries. And the wireless communication infrastructure just isn't here yet. It's not even a question of being too expensive. It's just the infrastructure isn't filled out.""The data isn't available," says Bill.
ruiz
All “overnight” successes take 10 years - Jeff Bezos
ruiz
This type of work is promising, but flu is such an adaptive adversary that the quest for a universal vaccine might take years, even decades, to fulfill. Progress will be incremental, but each increment will have value in itself. A universal-ish vaccine that, say, protected against all H1N1 strains would have prevented the 2009 pandemic. And reducing flu’s menace, even in some of its variants, would free up resources and intellectual capacity for dealing with other deadly diseases for which no vaccines exist at all.
ruiz
Everything worth doing takes time! - Justin Kan
ruiz
‘A mental model is basically a representation of the structure, function or behaviour of some system that you’re interested in – some real-world system that retains its sensory and motor properties that you get from perception,’ Nersessian said. When we manipulate a mental model, she argues, we use ‘some of the same kind of processing that you use to manipulate things in the real world’.
ruiz
Nersessian points to an example from the late American polymath Herbert Simon: how can you tally the number of windows in your home without looking? Simon believed that there’s only one way to produce an answer to this question: you create a model of your house in your mind, and take a virtual walk through it, counting the windows. But the virtual model is more than just a representation of the real thing. Manipulating either sort of model involves similar brain processes, Nersessian says – a claim backed up by recent brain-imaging studies.
ruiz
In articulating his account of how it is that we can think and speak at all, the Tractatus gives expression, sublime and exact but not wholly original, to a conception of ourselves that was arguably already latent in our intellectual culture. A conception of ourselves as representing beings – minds – which can represent the world to ourselves, think and say things that are true or false, and can have reliable means of acquiring truths about the world – which we call science. This picture of the nature of mind, and hence of ourselves, continues to be the default conception in the cognitive sciences. Minds are representational engines.
ruiz
The finalists were particularly innovative. The runner-up used two different techniques, a primary and a backup. In his first approach, he remade his desktop nameplate to look legitimate, but the side facing him included the answer in fine print. For his backup plan, he put the answer on a soda can that he concealed with his hand when the proctor walked by (see Figure 1b). The winner created a false book cover for a course text and replaced portions of the text with the answer, matching text color, font, and size (see Figure 1a). He then used hair spray to lightly tack the false page into place. The result was all but indistinguishable from the original book.
ruiz
Ibiki Morino appears and announces that the first part of Chūnin Exams is a written test and describes the rules: no asking questions. Ibiki also explains that a team's score will be added up at the end of the exam to see which teams pass. Various chūnin proctors line the sides of the room and watch the genin to catch cheaters. If caught cheating five times, the genin and his/her team are all disqualified. However the test proves exceedingly difficult, and eventually most candidates (Naruto and Sakura are exceptions) figure out the trick to the exam. In order to pass, they have to cheat without getting caught. They then used their respective skills to subtly cheat.
ruiz
Elon Musk: Why is there no Flat Mars Society!? Flat Earth Society: Hi Elon, thanks for the question. Unlike the Earth, Mars has been observed to be round. We hope you have a fantastic day!
ruiz
I’m just creating a lot, with more love in my heart for what I’m doing and for myself. Living a healthy life, keeping my family around and staying on a mission, which is making music that means something. I’m focusing on my art again and throwing myself back into it and wanting to write something with more of a positive outlook on things, because I’ve written the dark so well for so long. I wanted to bring the opposite of that, you know? I’m at a place where I was able to do that. It took me so long to get to that place, and I was really excited to write from that standpoint when I got there. Passion, Pain was more positive, but I wasn't necessarily living when I was writing it. Because I wrote that album before I went to rehab, then I came out and released it, I never really got a chance to write post-rehab, show the world where I’m at right now. That’s what Kids See Ghosts was: to update the world on where I’m at.
ruiz
In 1906, a radio engineer named Lee de Forest transmitted a message to an experimental phone in a car idling on a New York street: "How do you like your first wireless ride? The fire department, steamships, and railways ought to adopt the same method of communication." Not as dramatic as Samuel Morse's "What hath God wrought?", but the press release sent out by the president of De Forest Wireless turned out to be prescient. "Hereafter," he declared, "we hope it will be possible for businessmen, even while automobiling, to stay in constant touch."
ruiz
The third generation of data and voice communications -- the convergence of mobile phones and the Internet, high-speed wireless data access, intelligent networks, and pervasive computing -- will shape how we work, shop, pay bills, flirt, keep appointments, conduct wars, keep up with our children, and write poetry in the next century.
ruiz
Danny Stein, whose private equity firm owns eMusic, thinks the future of the business is to move away from the ownership model entirely. With ubiquitous broadband, both wired and wireless, more consumers will turn to the celestial jukebox of music services that offer every track ever made, playable on demand. Some of those tracks will be free to listeners and advertising-supported, like radio. Others, like eMusic and Rhapsody, will be subscription services. Today, digital music economics are dominated by the iPod, with its notion of a paid-up library of personal tracks. But as the networks improve, the comparative economic advantages of unlimited streamed music, either financed by advertising or a flat fee (infinite choice for $9.99 a month), may shift the market that way. And drive another nail in the coffin of the retail music model.
ruiz
“It’s not always lipstick that benefits,” said Toby Clark at Mintel. “In the last recession premium fragrances did really well. Beauty is just a really good example of an indulgent purchase that is relatively affordable so you can treat yourself without breaking the bank.” He said that when spare cash is tight, people try to save on dull basics, going for budget shampoos, milk from a discount chain or holding on to an ageing bed or washing machine, in order to afford feel-good treats where they believe they get more value for money.
ruiz
Believers in the lipstick theory trace the phenomenon back to the Depression, when cosmetic sales increased by 25%, despite the convulsing economy. Some, like Dhaval Joshi of RAB Capital, an investment-management firm, point out that employment in the cosmetics industry has been known to rise as overall employment falls, suggesting that demand for cosmetics increases when consumer confidence is low. This was so in the recessions of 1990 and 2001, according to Mr Joshi's recent report on what he calls the “lipstick effect”.
ruiz
The lipstick effect is the theory that when facing an economic crisis consumers will be more willing to buy less costly luxury goods. Instead of buying expensive fur coats, for example, people will buy expensive lipstick.
ruiz
Streaming services like Spotify and Deezer started to pop up in the late 2000s, offering almost the entire history of recorded music for $10 a month. The economics were very simple: At the height of the music industry, the average American consumer spent about $28 a year on music. Ask listeners to pay $10 every month, and over a year you’re getting them to pay more than quadruple what they ever did—a better experience that makes more money.
ruiz
“You pay $8-$12 a month for schmuck insurance. For the price of one movie ticket, you can get every movie that you won’t watch and will occasionally get some episodic, cool, original content. I’ve been paying $8 or $12 a month for Netflix for 10 years. I can’t remember the last time I watched a movie, but it’s schmuck insurance and it’s hard to cancel, and it’s just become a utility. I want it and I need it.”
ruiz
I am not the first one to argue that outrage toward cultural appropriation is a red herring. A 2016 video from by Natalie Parrott smartly questions whether abusing random white people for wearing dreadlocks will ultimately make it acceptable for Black people to wear locs and other natural hairstyles in professional environments. Like Parrot, I believe that cultural appropriation is not inherently bad. What is bad is the stealing, laziness, and caricaturing that’s become rampant within creative industries. If artists use existing art to create better art, it’s part of the creative process to acknowledge their place within a lineage. If that happens, there’s no need to be precious about purity — that’s cultural fascism.
ruiz
Beihang University researchers studied 70 million Weibo "tweets" over a six-month period, sorting them into the emotional categories of anger, joy, sadness, and disgust. While sadness and disgust didn't appear to cause sympathetic emotion, happy tweets were likely to cause joy among those who follow and retweet them. Unfortunately, rage was the emotion most likely to spread across social media, possessing a ripple effect that could spark irate posts up to three degrees of separation from the original message (so one angry post could negatively influence a follower of a follower of a follower — phew).
ruiz
Still other YouTubers make money by relying on “rage clicks”—saying something inflammatory for the purposes of press and views. Take “Dear Fat People,” a fat-shaming tirade by YouTuber Nicole Arbour. “Dear Fat People” made so much money that Arbour posted a Snapchat counting 50 dollar bills…but she also lost some of her branded deals and got blacklisted by the tight-knit YouTube community.
ruiz
4. I realized that the feeling a man preserves longest is anger. There is only enough flesh on a hungry man for anger: everything else leaves him indifferent. 15. I realized that one can live on anger.
ruiz
"First of all, I think that being great is doing something no one can do. But also what separates those people, the ones you mentioned like LeBron or like what I'm thinking with M.J. or Gretzky, it's just the duration," Woods said. "Being able to do it not just for one year or one game or a little spell, they're able to do it for a number of years and accumulate highlights that we will always look at. They're peppered in our memories."
ruiz
"The universe is full of magical things patiently waiting for our wits to grow sharper." -Eden Phillpotts
ruiz
Playboy: How long did it take to develop Macintosh? Jobs: It was more than two years on the computer itself. We had been working on the technology behind it for years before that. I don’t think I’ve ever worked so hard on something, but working on Macintosh was the neatest experience of my life. Almost everyone who worked on it will say that. None of us wanted to release it at the end. It was as though we knew that once it was out of our hands, it wouldn’t be ours anymore. When we finally presented it at the shareholders’ meeting, everyone in the auditorium stood up and gave it a five-minute ovation. What was incredible to me was that I could see the Mac team in the first few rows. It was as though none of us could believe that we’d actually finished it. Everyone started crying.
ruiz
"We're prepared for a relatively slow start, especially from our Macintosh experience, where it took until 1986 for the Macintosh to find its legs," says Andy. "Same thing here. The screens aren't really good enough to satisfy the customer we have in mind these days. It's too low-contrast. You have to kind of take this leap of faith. They don't run long enough on batteries. And the wireless communication infrastructure just isn't here yet. It's not even a question of being too expensive. It's just the infrastructure isn't filled out.""The data isn't available," says Bill.
ruiz
All “overnight” successes take 10 years - Jeff Bezos
ruiz
This type of work is promising, but flu is such an adaptive adversary that the quest for a universal vaccine might take years, even decades, to fulfill. Progress will be incremental, but each increment will have value in itself. A universal-ish vaccine that, say, protected against all H1N1 strains would have prevented the 2009 pandemic. And reducing flu’s menace, even in some of its variants, would free up resources and intellectual capacity for dealing with other deadly diseases for which no vaccines exist at all.
ruiz
Everything worth doing takes time! - Justin Kan
ruiz
‘A mental model is basically a representation of the structure, function or behaviour of some system that you’re interested in – some real-world system that retains its sensory and motor properties that you get from perception,’ Nersessian said. When we manipulate a mental model, she argues, we use ‘some of the same kind of processing that you use to manipulate things in the real world’.
ruiz
Nersessian points to an example from the late American polymath Herbert Simon: how can you tally the number of windows in your home without looking? Simon believed that there’s only one way to produce an answer to this question: you create a model of your house in your mind, and take a virtual walk through it, counting the windows. But the virtual model is more than just a representation of the real thing. Manipulating either sort of model involves similar brain processes, Nersessian says – a claim backed up by recent brain-imaging studies.
ruiz
In articulating his account of how it is that we can think and speak at all, the Tractatus gives expression, sublime and exact but not wholly original, to a conception of ourselves that was arguably already latent in our intellectual culture. A conception of ourselves as representing beings – minds – which can represent the world to ourselves, think and say things that are true or false, and can have reliable means of acquiring truths about the world – which we call science. This picture of the nature of mind, and hence of ourselves, continues to be the default conception in the cognitive sciences. Minds are representational engines.
ruiz
The finalists were particularly innovative. The runner-up used two different techniques, a primary and a backup. In his first approach, he remade his desktop nameplate to look legitimate, but the side facing him included the answer in fine print. For his backup plan, he put the answer on a soda can that he concealed with his hand when the proctor walked by (see Figure 1b). The winner created a false book cover for a course text and replaced portions of the text with the answer, matching text color, font, and size (see Figure 1a). He then used hair spray to lightly tack the false page into place. The result was all but indistinguishable from the original book.
ruiz
Ibiki Morino appears and announces that the first part of Chūnin Exams is a written test and describes the rules: no asking questions. Ibiki also explains that a team's score will be added up at the end of the exam to see which teams pass. Various chūnin proctors line the sides of the room and watch the genin to catch cheaters. If caught cheating five times, the genin and his/her team are all disqualified. However the test proves exceedingly difficult, and eventually most candidates (Naruto and Sakura are exceptions) figure out the trick to the exam. In order to pass, they have to cheat without getting caught. They then used their respective skills to subtly cheat.
ruiz
Elon Musk: Why is there no Flat Mars Society!? Flat Earth Society: Hi Elon, thanks for the question. Unlike the Earth, Mars has been observed to be round. We hope you have a fantastic day!
ruiz
I’m just creating a lot, with more love in my heart for what I’m doing and for myself. Living a healthy life, keeping my family around and staying on a mission, which is making music that means something. I’m focusing on my art again and throwing myself back into it and wanting to write something with more of a positive outlook on things, because I’ve written the dark so well for so long. I wanted to bring the opposite of that, you know? I’m at a place where I was able to do that. It took me so long to get to that place, and I was really excited to write from that standpoint when I got there. Passion, Pain was more positive, but I wasn't necessarily living when I was writing it. Because I wrote that album before I went to rehab, then I came out and released it, I never really got a chance to write post-rehab, show the world where I’m at right now. That’s what Kids See Ghosts was: to update the world on where I’m at.
ruiz
In 1906, a radio engineer named Lee de Forest transmitted a message to an experimental phone in a car idling on a New York street: "How do you like your first wireless ride? The fire department, steamships, and railways ought to adopt the same method of communication." Not as dramatic as Samuel Morse's "What hath God wrought?", but the press release sent out by the president of De Forest Wireless turned out to be prescient. "Hereafter," he declared, "we hope it will be possible for businessmen, even while automobiling, to stay in constant touch."
ruiz
The third generation of data and voice communications -- the convergence of mobile phones and the Internet, high-speed wireless data access, intelligent networks, and pervasive computing -- will shape how we work, shop, pay bills, flirt, keep appointments, conduct wars, keep up with our children, and write poetry in the next century.
ruiz
Danny Stein, whose private equity firm owns eMusic, thinks the future of the business is to move away from the ownership model entirely. With ubiquitous broadband, both wired and wireless, more consumers will turn to the celestial jukebox of music services that offer every track ever made, playable on demand. Some of those tracks will be free to listeners and advertising-supported, like radio. Others, like eMusic and Rhapsody, will be subscription services. Today, digital music economics are dominated by the iPod, with its notion of a paid-up library of personal tracks. But as the networks improve, the comparative economic advantages of unlimited streamed music, either financed by advertising or a flat fee (infinite choice for $9.99 a month), may shift the market that way. And drive another nail in the coffin of the retail music model.
ruiz
“It’s not always lipstick that benefits,” said Toby Clark at Mintel. “In the last recession premium fragrances did really well. Beauty is just a really good example of an indulgent purchase that is relatively affordable so you can treat yourself without breaking the bank.” He said that when spare cash is tight, people try to save on dull basics, going for budget shampoos, milk from a discount chain or holding on to an ageing bed or washing machine, in order to afford feel-good treats where they believe they get more value for money.
ruiz
Believers in the lipstick theory trace the phenomenon back to the Depression, when cosmetic sales increased by 25%, despite the convulsing economy. Some, like Dhaval Joshi of RAB Capital, an investment-management firm, point out that employment in the cosmetics industry has been known to rise as overall employment falls, suggesting that demand for cosmetics increases when consumer confidence is low. This was so in the recessions of 1990 and 2001, according to Mr Joshi's recent report on what he calls the “lipstick effect”.
ruiz
The lipstick effect is the theory that when facing an economic crisis consumers will be more willing to buy less costly luxury goods. Instead of buying expensive fur coats, for example, people will buy expensive lipstick.
ruiz
Streaming services like Spotify and Deezer started to pop up in the late 2000s, offering almost the entire history of recorded music for $10 a month. The economics were very simple: At the height of the music industry, the average American consumer spent about $28 a year on music. Ask listeners to pay $10 every month, and over a year you’re getting them to pay more than quadruple what they ever did—a better experience that makes more money.
ruiz
“You pay $8-$12 a month for schmuck insurance. For the price of one movie ticket, you can get every movie that you won’t watch and will occasionally get some episodic, cool, original content. I’ve been paying $8 or $12 a month for Netflix for 10 years. I can’t remember the last time I watched a movie, but it’s schmuck insurance and it’s hard to cancel, and it’s just become a utility. I want it and I need it.”
ruiz
I am not the first one to argue that outrage toward cultural appropriation is a red herring. A 2016 video from by Natalie Parrott smartly questions whether abusing random white people for wearing dreadlocks will ultimately make it acceptable for Black people to wear locs and other natural hairstyles in professional environments. Like Parrot, I believe that cultural appropriation is not inherently bad. What is bad is the stealing, laziness, and caricaturing that’s become rampant within creative industries. If artists use existing art to create better art, it’s part of the creative process to acknowledge their place within a lineage. If that happens, there’s no need to be precious about purity — that’s cultural fascism.
ruiz
Beihang University researchers studied 70 million Weibo "tweets" over a six-month period, sorting them into the emotional categories of anger, joy, sadness, and disgust. While sadness and disgust didn't appear to cause sympathetic emotion, happy tweets were likely to cause joy among those who follow and retweet them. Unfortunately, rage was the emotion most likely to spread across social media, possessing a ripple effect that could spark irate posts up to three degrees of separation from the original message (so one angry post could negatively influence a follower of a follower of a follower — phew).
ruiz
Still other YouTubers make money by relying on “rage clicks”—saying something inflammatory for the purposes of press and views. Take “Dear Fat People,” a fat-shaming tirade by YouTuber Nicole Arbour. “Dear Fat People” made so much money that Arbour posted a Snapchat counting 50 dollar bills…but she also lost some of her branded deals and got blacklisted by the tight-knit YouTube community.
ruiz
4. I realized that the feeling a man preserves longest is anger. There is only enough flesh on a hungry man for anger: everything else leaves him indifferent. 15. I realized that one can live on anger.
ruiz