Everything Collections Notes

george liu / @gliu

mad flavor scientist @ sundae. say hi @ george@sundae.space
As Loar (1964, p. 222) ponders: “Can religion go beyond psychoanalysis? Is there a reality, a space, which belongs with religion and which psychoanalysis can formulate yet remain neutral to? Is there a surplus value to religious reality which need not be viewed as instinctual in nature, can be mentally represented and need not be mourned?” Recently on a radio program about adolescence,one of the teenagers interviewed said, “Without religion we are left only with our instincts.” Part of the job of psychotherapy is to examine these instincts,the conflicts with them and the defenses against them. As Freud said, “Where id was, ego shall be.” But do fundamentalist religious beliefs about trying to control impulses leave the psychotherapist with an inability to examine these impulses? Does this then translate into a superego control over both patient and therapist that inhibits the examination of a part of the psyche? In this equation, is Freud’s rule reinterpreted to be “Where id is superego should be”? In other words, just what is it that happens when a person with a closed belief system comes to therapy?
gliu
Systems of religious knowledge obviously include potentials generating violence that are rooted in their very core structure. In actualizing these potentials they set free a dynamics that deeply changes the structure of the religiously conceived lifeworld and its systems of typifications and relevances (Schutz 1962a). Thus far we have considered the rising of violence caused by the division of religious lifeworlds in profane and sacred areas. We have argued that violence originates in the interplay of both areas where “sacrality” as transcendent power legitimizes the everyday order and we have seen how the rigidity of religious systems hereof results. Paradoxically, it is precisely this rigidity that brings dynamics into the structure of the religiously interpreted lifeworld. This dynamics indeed generates a new potency of violence as the structure of those lifeworlds is not only shaped by the separation of the profane and the “sacred” but, based on this difference, also by processes of inclusion and exclusion (Oberdorfer and Waldmann 2008: 78 ff.; generally Luhmann 2002: 208 ff). Without a doubt, these processes are present in many areas of social reality and can be activated by various factors. Given this, it is imperative to explore how they are built into the structure of religious systems of knowledge.
gliu
Matthew Bagger, The Uses of Paradox : Religion, Self-transformation, and the Absurd
From the very inception of the naturalistic study of religion in the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries, students of religion have remarked on the prevalence of contradiction and paradox in religious discourse. Hobbes, for instance, wryly observes, “That which taketh away the reputation of Wisdome, in him that formeth a Religion, or addeth to it when it is already formed, is the enjoyning of a belief of contradictories.” A century later Hume, giving the topic more attention, claims in The Natural History of Religion that “all popular theology” [i.e., all theology except philosophical deism] exhibits “a kind of appetite for absurdity and contradiction.” Both Hobbes and Hume have specific contradictions in mind, of course; their comments have polemical intent directed at Christian scholasticism. Nevertheless, both believed that Christian history instances a more universal generalization, and both (to diff erent degrees) sought to explain the causes and describe the eff ects of religion’s predilection for what in more recent parlance we call paradox.
gliu
Researchers find that religious people, on average, report higher subjective well-being (SWB; e.g., Hackney & Sanders, 2003; Koenig & Larson, 2001) and also have fewer psychosocial pathologies such as domestic abuse (e.g., Waite & Lehrer, 2003). In the National Opinion Research Center's General Social Surveys of Americans between 1972 and 2008, the percentage of people reporting that they were “very happy” ranged from 26% among those never attending religious services to 48% among those attending services more than weekly. However, people in the wealthiest nations tend to be leaving organized religion or have no specific religious affiliation (e.g., Pew Forum on Religion & Public Life, 2007). This exiting from organized religion is most pronounced in Northern Europe and in many other highly economically developed nations. Why are people leaving organized religion in nations where religious freedom is high, if it is associated with benefits such as higher SWB?
gliu
But in returning to society to provide the violence that must stand as the frontline enforcement of the law, the cowboy becomes a figure not of the wild or its freedom but of a rudimentary social order. This tension is the contradiction of American frontier mythology in microcosm, insofar as western settlers, romanticized for their freedom from social and civic constraint, are precisely who colonized the wild, fenced off its freedom, and cultivated its natural open spaces. Historian Eric Hobsbawm notes the curious inversion of American and Canadian frontier myths — the former emphasizing the individual’s escape from society into the harsh freedom of the wild, the latter the imposition of order, in the form of society, on a violent and savage nature.
gliu
Yeah, almost any mystic of any religion will tell you that basically, there’s a necessary paradox at the heart of any spiritual belief. And so if you get to the paradox, it means you’re at the root. It’s not like it means it’s wrong. No, it means it’s true.
gliu
Given Mr. Kushner’s political inexperience, the private exchanges could make him susceptible to Saudi manipulation, said three former senior American officials. In an effort to tighten practices at the White House, a new chief of staff tried to reimpose longstanding procedures stipulating that National Security Council staff members should participate in all calls with foreign leaders.
gliu
To preserve a web that serves all of humanity, not just the privileged and the powerful, we will have to fight for it. That’s why I’m asking governments, companies and citizens across the globe to commit to a set of core principles for the web.
gliu
Creativity and inspiration always comes from one's life experiences. To maximize creativity you must actually live life to the fullest—not behind a screen. You need to be somewhat fearless and not afraid to take risks. Push yourself to be innovative, but at the same time be true to your vision. Push yourself to expand your boundaries but in an organic manner. This 'push' is easier when you are motivated by something bigger than yourself.
gliu
"The question is whether we could charge and still achieve ubiquity. Theoretically, if we could do that, it would be better to get ubiquity and get paid. My sense is there may be some price we could charge that wouldn't interfere with ubiquity, but this price wouldn't be enough to make us real money. Conversely, we could probably make real money of we were willing to sacrifice ubiquity, but that doesn't seem like the right trade here."
gliu
One of Napoleon's great gifts was in compartmentalizing pieces of his life. His tumultuous and frankly soul-crushing personal life (which affected him deeply) with Josephine never got in the way of his military victories. I wonder if that's a good model, up-to-a-point for people and groups. With people, by compartmentalizing some unsavory perspective someone has, you have the ability to change it later on through discussion.
gliu
While some people can start a company while still working a full-time job, Silbermann says that was a crutch for him. "It always stalled," he said. "It wasn't the right market. It wasn’t the right timing. But actually the only dependent variable was just me. I never actually committed and put myself in the position where I had to commit. For me at least, the act of committing and going out and doing it turned out to be a really important thing."
gliu
Yes, stickers: the soundest investment I ever made. I used to travel around the country a lot (thank you, Chinatown bus), and everywhere I went I took stickers with me. I put them on signs, poles, and even other advertisements.
gliu
In this article, we develop a framework for examining the David and Goliath narrative when it is used as a rhetorical strategy in political and social movement discourse. We argue that the stance of the aggrieved Party (David) is a rhetorical resource that serves two functions for both mainstream political and oppositional social movement actors. First, it potentially legitimizes the use of violence in a social conflict by figuring political collectives as aggrieved victims. Second, it crafts a paradoxical collective persona: that of an oppressed militant (in the case of social movements) or a mighty victim (in the case of hegemonic powers), an agent who is at once both powerful and oppressed. It is beyond the scope of this article to analyze in detail the disparate treatment by the media of oppressed militants (framed negatively) and the hegemonic stance of “righteous victim” used to justify wars against weaker foes (framed positively). However, we make a note of this distinction’s importance toward the conclusion of this article. Elsewhere (Cloud & Gatchet, 2008), we argue that mainstream mass media and, by extension, the publics they influence, tacitly and problematically regard the violence of established powerful entities as more credible than self-defense among oppressed groups. Here we focus on the first dimension of the David and Goliath narrative by exploring the rhetoric of militancy among the oppressed as developed by members of the Black Panther Party for Self-Defense.
gliu
But the curious thing about a guilty pleasure is that it is guilty; we know that what we are doing could be better, but resolve to enjoy it anyway. Adorno sees this as the very core of what is wrong with popular culture. As far as Adorno is concerned, we are not fooled. We know exactly what we are getting, and how shoddy it is, but desire it all the same: That is the triumph of advertising in the culture industry: the compulsive imitation by consumers of cultural commodities which, at the same time, they recognise as false. […] The phrase, the world wants to be deceived, has become truer than had ever been intended. People are not only, as the saying goes, falling for the swindle; if it guarantees them even the most fleeting gratification they desire a deception which is nonetheless transparent to them.
gliu
But your concept of yourself makes no sense. You got it from a rom-com. Age 35 is not an expiration date on your beauty or your worth. It doesn’t matter if every single human alive believes this. It’s your job to cast this notion out forever. I’m 48 years old and I’m determined not to tell a story about myself that started in some beauty-product boardroom, among unimaginative corporate marketing professionals. I fail at this quest often, but I’m still determined. I’m going to choose to embrace narratives that make me feel more alive and able to contribute whatever twisted crafts I can to this world, while I can.
gliu
Shame is the opposite of art. When you live inside of your shame, everything you see is inadequate and embarrassing. A lifetime of traveling and having adventures and not being tethered to long-term commitments looks empty and pathetic and foolish, through the lens of shame. You haven’t found a partner. Your face is aging. Your body will only grow weaker. Your mind is less elastic. Your time is running out. Shame turns every emotion into the manifestation of some personality flaw, every casual choice into a giant mistake, every small blunder into a moral failure. Shame means that you’re damned and you’ve accomplished nothing and it’s all downhill from here.
gliu
What I wish I could have told myself when I was hopeless about my writing prospects is that I should have defined artistic success in ways that weren’t shaped by forces beyond my control. Sometimes, success is getting a handful of words you don’t totally hate on the page. Sometimes success is working a full-time job to support your family and raising your kids and finding a way, over several years, to write and finish a novel. Sometimes it’s selling a book to a small press for 25 copies of your book and a vague promise of royalties you may never see. And sometimes, if you are very lucky, artistic success is marked by the glittery things so many of us yearn for — the big money deals, the critical accolades, the multicity book tours, the movie options.
gliu
God is just what happens when humanity is connected.
gliu
“The fact of the matter is, there’s an incredible amount of luck,” Mason said. “There’s a lot of entrepreneurs out there who are way smarter and more capable than I am, that have never had the kind of success of Groupon.” “I was never comfortable with the amount of adulation, all of that, on the way up,” he added. “I responded to that aggressively, by going out of my way to seem stupid.”
gliu
As I described the situation to a good friend on the phone that day, he stopped me mid-sentence and said “put aside your concerns about the job or the ‘ladder’ and tell me about your partner.” In response, I said that I thought Saneel was brilliant. I was confident I’d be able to learn a lot from him and that I had the feeling we’d work well together. “Well then, I think you have your answer” he replied. And he was right.
gliu
I'm always really impressed by young people, early in their careers or without any career experience at all, who intuit this and are confident in their convictions and get stuff done despite their inexperience. When I was young I was convinced that life beyond academia in all fields would be this super serious, mega competitive space where most everyone has everything figured out. That everyone who was there, in any kind of profession, would be super smart and really know their game inside out. When I started my career I assumed frankly that my opinions were wrong, because of this. In my first job there were a lot of aspects that were almost the parody of how not to do things, yet even though I sensed this intuitively I convinced myself probably for the first year that I must be wrong and this must just be the way things are done in industry. That I would eventually figure out that this was the right way to do things. It's quite funny to look back on that in retrospect. What I find most impressive about tales of young company builders and leaders, the classic Gates/Jobs/Zuckerberg etc, is not actually what they did but that they had the sheer temerity to do it at that age without first building their confidence in industry for a few years. How did they know that they had the ability to build companies such as theirs -- surely were it possible one of the adults with 10-20 years industry experience would have figured it out already? How did they have the confidence to hold their own when confronted with such adults (many of whom I'm sure challenged them and competed with them for influence) as their companies grew? Truly awe inspiring.
gliu
Now many of the companies that make the shows and movies that Netflix delivers to mailboxes, computer screens and televisions — companies whose stocks have not enjoyed the same frothy rise, and whose chief executives have not won the same accolades — are pushing back, arguing that the company is overhyped, and vowing to charge much more to license their content. “It’s a little bit like, is the Albanian army going to take over the world?” said Jeffrey L. Bewkes, the chief executive of Time Warner, in an interview last week. “I don’t think so.”
gliu
We are left to consider that perhaps UX, particularly to the mass market, really doesn't matter. Or maybe that Amazon has such an entrenched lead, mindshare or other, it can weather some horrible, horrible experiences.
gliu
Amazon has all these extra features — Subscribe & Save! Warranty! Dash button! But with Amazon’s fractured marketplace, with tons of different sellers, all these innovations become deranged and useless, scammy at worst or irrational at best. Have you ever tried searching Amazon for an everyday product that comes in a ton of options, like, say, diapers? It’s a nightmare: all the different quantity counts, the different sellers. Diapers are the kind of thing people love to buy from Amazon, but it’s like diving into a war zone.
gliu
"I have this hobby. Normal people collect stamps, and I try to give my cheese to Putin," Sirota says. "I know about a hundred ways how to get into an event with Putin, but every time, his security takes away my cheese." After his on-camera offering to the Russian president last month, Sirota says he received a visitor claiming to represent "you know who." Sirota eagerly loaded up the mysterious guest's car with 100 pounds of his best cheese and saw him off. "Now I'm sitting here wondering if he really came from Vladimir Putin or was some kind of con artist," Sirota says. "My wife says I'm an idiot." Sirota laughs out loud. He doesn't seem bothered in the least.
gliu
Flamin' Hot Cheetos Turkey
The Flamin' Hot Cheetos Turkey turns your bird bright red, and is actually pretty easy to make. Here's how it works: First up, grab a few bags of Flamin' Hot Cheetos. Crush them up in a food processor, or place them in a zip-top bag and smash them with a rolling pin. Brush the turkey with oil or butter, then coat with the crushed chips.
gliu
Until a few months ago, Snap’s board meetings could be tense affairs. Benchmark partner Mitch Lasky, a Snap director until August, on occasion would challenge CEO Evan Spiegel about the company’s failure to meet Wall Street expectations for user growth and profits. Mr. Spiegel, who spends most board meetings looking at his phone and messaging people on Snapchat, was dismissive of Mr. Lasky's concerns, according to people with knowledge of the board discussions.
gliu
Simple Roast Turkey
For all the attention we lavish on Thanksgiving turkeys, the truth is more work does not necessarily yield a better bird. That’s why I swear by no brining, no stuffing, no trussing and no basting. Instead of a messy wet brine, I use a dry rub (well, technically a dry brine) — a salt and pepper massage that locks in moisture and seasons the flesh. No stuffing or trussing allows the bird to cook more quickly, with the white and dark meat finishing closer to the same time. And if you oil but don’t baste your turkey, you’ll get crisp skin without constantly opening the oven.
gliu
As CEO, there will be many times when you feel like quitting. I have seen CEOs try to cope with the stress by drinking heavily, checking out, and even quitting. In each case, the CEO has a marvelous rationalization why it was OK for him to punk out or quit, but none them will ever be great CEOs. Great CEOs face the pain. They deal with the sleepless nights, the cold sweat, and what my friend the great Alfred Chuang (legendary founder and CEO of BEA Systems) calls “the torture.” Whenever I meet a successful CEO, I ask them how they did it. Mediocre CEOs point to their brilliant strategic moves or their intuitive business sense or a variety of other self-congratulatory explanations. The great CEOs tend to be remarkably consistent in their answers. They all say: “I didn’t quit.”
gliu
As Loar (1964, p. 222) ponders: “Can religion go beyond psychoanalysis? Is there a reality, a space, which belongs with religion and which psychoanalysis can formulate yet remain neutral to? Is there a surplus value to religious reality which need not be viewed as instinctual in nature, can be mentally represented and need not be mourned?” Recently on a radio program about adolescence,one of the teenagers interviewed said, “Without religion we are left only with our instincts.” Part of the job of psychotherapy is to examine these instincts,the conflicts with them and the defenses against them. As Freud said, “Where id was, ego shall be.” But do fundamentalist religious beliefs about trying to control impulses leave the psychotherapist with an inability to examine these impulses? Does this then translate into a superego control over both patient and therapist that inhibits the examination of a part of the psyche? In this equation, is Freud’s rule reinterpreted to be “Where id is superego should be”? In other words, just what is it that happens when a person with a closed belief system comes to therapy?
gliu
Systems of religious knowledge obviously include potentials generating violence that are rooted in their very core structure. In actualizing these potentials they set free a dynamics that deeply changes the structure of the religiously conceived lifeworld and its systems of typifications and relevances (Schutz 1962a). Thus far we have considered the rising of violence caused by the division of religious lifeworlds in profane and sacred areas. We have argued that violence originates in the interplay of both areas where “sacrality” as transcendent power legitimizes the everyday order and we have seen how the rigidity of religious systems hereof results. Paradoxically, it is precisely this rigidity that brings dynamics into the structure of the religiously interpreted lifeworld. This dynamics indeed generates a new potency of violence as the structure of those lifeworlds is not only shaped by the separation of the profane and the “sacred” but, based on this difference, also by processes of inclusion and exclusion (Oberdorfer and Waldmann 2008: 78 ff.; generally Luhmann 2002: 208 ff). Without a doubt, these processes are present in many areas of social reality and can be activated by various factors. Given this, it is imperative to explore how they are built into the structure of religious systems of knowledge.
gliu
Matthew Bagger, The Uses of Paradox : Religion, Self-transformation, and the Absurd
From the very inception of the naturalistic study of religion in the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries, students of religion have remarked on the prevalence of contradiction and paradox in religious discourse. Hobbes, for instance, wryly observes, “That which taketh away the reputation of Wisdome, in him that formeth a Religion, or addeth to it when it is already formed, is the enjoyning of a belief of contradictories.” A century later Hume, giving the topic more attention, claims in The Natural History of Religion that “all popular theology” [i.e., all theology except philosophical deism] exhibits “a kind of appetite for absurdity and contradiction.” Both Hobbes and Hume have specific contradictions in mind, of course; their comments have polemical intent directed at Christian scholasticism. Nevertheless, both believed that Christian history instances a more universal generalization, and both (to diff erent degrees) sought to explain the causes and describe the eff ects of religion’s predilection for what in more recent parlance we call paradox.
gliu
Researchers find that religious people, on average, report higher subjective well-being (SWB; e.g., Hackney & Sanders, 2003; Koenig & Larson, 2001) and also have fewer psychosocial pathologies such as domestic abuse (e.g., Waite & Lehrer, 2003). In the National Opinion Research Center's General Social Surveys of Americans between 1972 and 2008, the percentage of people reporting that they were “very happy” ranged from 26% among those never attending religious services to 48% among those attending services more than weekly. However, people in the wealthiest nations tend to be leaving organized religion or have no specific religious affiliation (e.g., Pew Forum on Religion & Public Life, 2007). This exiting from organized religion is most pronounced in Northern Europe and in many other highly economically developed nations. Why are people leaving organized religion in nations where religious freedom is high, if it is associated with benefits such as higher SWB?
gliu
But in returning to society to provide the violence that must stand as the frontline enforcement of the law, the cowboy becomes a figure not of the wild or its freedom but of a rudimentary social order. This tension is the contradiction of American frontier mythology in microcosm, insofar as western settlers, romanticized for their freedom from social and civic constraint, are precisely who colonized the wild, fenced off its freedom, and cultivated its natural open spaces. Historian Eric Hobsbawm notes the curious inversion of American and Canadian frontier myths — the former emphasizing the individual’s escape from society into the harsh freedom of the wild, the latter the imposition of order, in the form of society, on a violent and savage nature.
gliu
Yeah, almost any mystic of any religion will tell you that basically, there’s a necessary paradox at the heart of any spiritual belief. And so if you get to the paradox, it means you’re at the root. It’s not like it means it’s wrong. No, it means it’s true.
gliu
Given Mr. Kushner’s political inexperience, the private exchanges could make him susceptible to Saudi manipulation, said three former senior American officials. In an effort to tighten practices at the White House, a new chief of staff tried to reimpose longstanding procedures stipulating that National Security Council staff members should participate in all calls with foreign leaders.
gliu
To preserve a web that serves all of humanity, not just the privileged and the powerful, we will have to fight for it. That’s why I’m asking governments, companies and citizens across the globe to commit to a set of core principles for the web.
gliu
Creativity and inspiration always comes from one's life experiences. To maximize creativity you must actually live life to the fullest—not behind a screen. You need to be somewhat fearless and not afraid to take risks. Push yourself to be innovative, but at the same time be true to your vision. Push yourself to expand your boundaries but in an organic manner. This 'push' is easier when you are motivated by something bigger than yourself.
gliu
"The question is whether we could charge and still achieve ubiquity. Theoretically, if we could do that, it would be better to get ubiquity and get paid. My sense is there may be some price we could charge that wouldn't interfere with ubiquity, but this price wouldn't be enough to make us real money. Conversely, we could probably make real money of we were willing to sacrifice ubiquity, but that doesn't seem like the right trade here."
gliu
One of Napoleon's great gifts was in compartmentalizing pieces of his life. His tumultuous and frankly soul-crushing personal life (which affected him deeply) with Josephine never got in the way of his military victories. I wonder if that's a good model, up-to-a-point for people and groups. With people, by compartmentalizing some unsavory perspective someone has, you have the ability to change it later on through discussion.
gliu
While some people can start a company while still working a full-time job, Silbermann says that was a crutch for him. "It always stalled," he said. "It wasn't the right market. It wasn’t the right timing. But actually the only dependent variable was just me. I never actually committed and put myself in the position where I had to commit. For me at least, the act of committing and going out and doing it turned out to be a really important thing."
gliu
Yes, stickers: the soundest investment I ever made. I used to travel around the country a lot (thank you, Chinatown bus), and everywhere I went I took stickers with me. I put them on signs, poles, and even other advertisements.
gliu
In this article, we develop a framework for examining the David and Goliath narrative when it is used as a rhetorical strategy in political and social movement discourse. We argue that the stance of the aggrieved Party (David) is a rhetorical resource that serves two functions for both mainstream political and oppositional social movement actors. First, it potentially legitimizes the use of violence in a social conflict by figuring political collectives as aggrieved victims. Second, it crafts a paradoxical collective persona: that of an oppressed militant (in the case of social movements) or a mighty victim (in the case of hegemonic powers), an agent who is at once both powerful and oppressed. It is beyond the scope of this article to analyze in detail the disparate treatment by the media of oppressed militants (framed negatively) and the hegemonic stance of “righteous victim” used to justify wars against weaker foes (framed positively). However, we make a note of this distinction’s importance toward the conclusion of this article. Elsewhere (Cloud & Gatchet, 2008), we argue that mainstream mass media and, by extension, the publics they influence, tacitly and problematically regard the violence of established powerful entities as more credible than self-defense among oppressed groups. Here we focus on the first dimension of the David and Goliath narrative by exploring the rhetoric of militancy among the oppressed as developed by members of the Black Panther Party for Self-Defense.
gliu
But the curious thing about a guilty pleasure is that it is guilty; we know that what we are doing could be better, but resolve to enjoy it anyway. Adorno sees this as the very core of what is wrong with popular culture. As far as Adorno is concerned, we are not fooled. We know exactly what we are getting, and how shoddy it is, but desire it all the same: That is the triumph of advertising in the culture industry: the compulsive imitation by consumers of cultural commodities which, at the same time, they recognise as false. […] The phrase, the world wants to be deceived, has become truer than had ever been intended. People are not only, as the saying goes, falling for the swindle; if it guarantees them even the most fleeting gratification they desire a deception which is nonetheless transparent to them.
gliu
But your concept of yourself makes no sense. You got it from a rom-com. Age 35 is not an expiration date on your beauty or your worth. It doesn’t matter if every single human alive believes this. It’s your job to cast this notion out forever. I’m 48 years old and I’m determined not to tell a story about myself that started in some beauty-product boardroom, among unimaginative corporate marketing professionals. I fail at this quest often, but I’m still determined. I’m going to choose to embrace narratives that make me feel more alive and able to contribute whatever twisted crafts I can to this world, while I can.
gliu
Shame is the opposite of art. When you live inside of your shame, everything you see is inadequate and embarrassing. A lifetime of traveling and having adventures and not being tethered to long-term commitments looks empty and pathetic and foolish, through the lens of shame. You haven’t found a partner. Your face is aging. Your body will only grow weaker. Your mind is less elastic. Your time is running out. Shame turns every emotion into the manifestation of some personality flaw, every casual choice into a giant mistake, every small blunder into a moral failure. Shame means that you’re damned and you’ve accomplished nothing and it’s all downhill from here.
gliu
What I wish I could have told myself when I was hopeless about my writing prospects is that I should have defined artistic success in ways that weren’t shaped by forces beyond my control. Sometimes, success is getting a handful of words you don’t totally hate on the page. Sometimes success is working a full-time job to support your family and raising your kids and finding a way, over several years, to write and finish a novel. Sometimes it’s selling a book to a small press for 25 copies of your book and a vague promise of royalties you may never see. And sometimes, if you are very lucky, artistic success is marked by the glittery things so many of us yearn for — the big money deals, the critical accolades, the multicity book tours, the movie options.
gliu
God is just what happens when humanity is connected.
gliu
“The fact of the matter is, there’s an incredible amount of luck,” Mason said. “There’s a lot of entrepreneurs out there who are way smarter and more capable than I am, that have never had the kind of success of Groupon.” “I was never comfortable with the amount of adulation, all of that, on the way up,” he added. “I responded to that aggressively, by going out of my way to seem stupid.”
gliu
As I described the situation to a good friend on the phone that day, he stopped me mid-sentence and said “put aside your concerns about the job or the ‘ladder’ and tell me about your partner.” In response, I said that I thought Saneel was brilliant. I was confident I’d be able to learn a lot from him and that I had the feeling we’d work well together. “Well then, I think you have your answer” he replied. And he was right.
gliu
I'm always really impressed by young people, early in their careers or without any career experience at all, who intuit this and are confident in their convictions and get stuff done despite their inexperience. When I was young I was convinced that life beyond academia in all fields would be this super serious, mega competitive space where most everyone has everything figured out. That everyone who was there, in any kind of profession, would be super smart and really know their game inside out. When I started my career I assumed frankly that my opinions were wrong, because of this. In my first job there were a lot of aspects that were almost the parody of how not to do things, yet even though I sensed this intuitively I convinced myself probably for the first year that I must be wrong and this must just be the way things are done in industry. That I would eventually figure out that this was the right way to do things. It's quite funny to look back on that in retrospect. What I find most impressive about tales of young company builders and leaders, the classic Gates/Jobs/Zuckerberg etc, is not actually what they did but that they had the sheer temerity to do it at that age without first building their confidence in industry for a few years. How did they know that they had the ability to build companies such as theirs -- surely were it possible one of the adults with 10-20 years industry experience would have figured it out already? How did they have the confidence to hold their own when confronted with such adults (many of whom I'm sure challenged them and competed with them for influence) as their companies grew? Truly awe inspiring.
gliu
Now many of the companies that make the shows and movies that Netflix delivers to mailboxes, computer screens and televisions — companies whose stocks have not enjoyed the same frothy rise, and whose chief executives have not won the same accolades — are pushing back, arguing that the company is overhyped, and vowing to charge much more to license their content. “It’s a little bit like, is the Albanian army going to take over the world?” said Jeffrey L. Bewkes, the chief executive of Time Warner, in an interview last week. “I don’t think so.”
gliu
We are left to consider that perhaps UX, particularly to the mass market, really doesn't matter. Or maybe that Amazon has such an entrenched lead, mindshare or other, it can weather some horrible, horrible experiences.
gliu
Amazon has all these extra features — Subscribe & Save! Warranty! Dash button! But with Amazon’s fractured marketplace, with tons of different sellers, all these innovations become deranged and useless, scammy at worst or irrational at best. Have you ever tried searching Amazon for an everyday product that comes in a ton of options, like, say, diapers? It’s a nightmare: all the different quantity counts, the different sellers. Diapers are the kind of thing people love to buy from Amazon, but it’s like diving into a war zone.
gliu
"I have this hobby. Normal people collect stamps, and I try to give my cheese to Putin," Sirota says. "I know about a hundred ways how to get into an event with Putin, but every time, his security takes away my cheese." After his on-camera offering to the Russian president last month, Sirota says he received a visitor claiming to represent "you know who." Sirota eagerly loaded up the mysterious guest's car with 100 pounds of his best cheese and saw him off. "Now I'm sitting here wondering if he really came from Vladimir Putin or was some kind of con artist," Sirota says. "My wife says I'm an idiot." Sirota laughs out loud. He doesn't seem bothered in the least.
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Flamin' Hot Cheetos Turkey
The Flamin' Hot Cheetos Turkey turns your bird bright red, and is actually pretty easy to make. Here's how it works: First up, grab a few bags of Flamin' Hot Cheetos. Crush them up in a food processor, or place them in a zip-top bag and smash them with a rolling pin. Brush the turkey with oil or butter, then coat with the crushed chips.
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Until a few months ago, Snap’s board meetings could be tense affairs. Benchmark partner Mitch Lasky, a Snap director until August, on occasion would challenge CEO Evan Spiegel about the company’s failure to meet Wall Street expectations for user growth and profits. Mr. Spiegel, who spends most board meetings looking at his phone and messaging people on Snapchat, was dismissive of Mr. Lasky's concerns, according to people with knowledge of the board discussions.
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Simple Roast Turkey
For all the attention we lavish on Thanksgiving turkeys, the truth is more work does not necessarily yield a better bird. That’s why I swear by no brining, no stuffing, no trussing and no basting. Instead of a messy wet brine, I use a dry rub (well, technically a dry brine) — a salt and pepper massage that locks in moisture and seasons the flesh. No stuffing or trussing allows the bird to cook more quickly, with the white and dark meat finishing closer to the same time. And if you oil but don’t baste your turkey, you’ll get crisp skin without constantly opening the oven.
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As CEO, there will be many times when you feel like quitting. I have seen CEOs try to cope with the stress by drinking heavily, checking out, and even quitting. In each case, the CEO has a marvelous rationalization why it was OK for him to punk out or quit, but none them will ever be great CEOs. Great CEOs face the pain. They deal with the sleepless nights, the cold sweat, and what my friend the great Alfred Chuang (legendary founder and CEO of BEA Systems) calls “the torture.” Whenever I meet a successful CEO, I ask them how they did it. Mediocre CEOs point to their brilliant strategic moves or their intuitive business sense or a variety of other self-congratulatory explanations. The great CEOs tend to be remarkably consistent in their answers. They all say: “I didn’t quit.”
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